Reconnect with Nature on a Valentine’s Night Forest Therapy Walk

Published on: 2019/02/01 - in Releases

RELEASE — The Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority (CRCA) is continuing its innovative and immersive Forest Therapy Walks program, as a way of encouraging area residents to reconnect with nature in a deeper, more meaningful way.

In the spirit of deep, meaningful connections, the CRCA is hosting a special Forest Therapy Walk in honour of Valentine’s Day. Bring your special someone or come on your own and share in all the forest has to offer on this occasion as part of a group experience.


Article continues after ad


For the first time since beginning the program more than a year ago, we will be hosting a Forest Therapy Walk after dark, Thursday, February 14, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., at the Little Cataraqui Creek Conservation Area.

The cost is $20 per person, which includes the gate fee. Register for this walk at crca.ca/online-services.

The practice of Forest Therapy was recently founded through the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides, based in California. The founders of this mindful, healing and connective practice were inspired by the Japanese practice of “Shinrin-yoku” which translates as “forest bathing.”

Research has determined that spending time in nature not only strengthens the human immune response and reduces stress, but also makes us more creative, mindful, and content in our lives. It may also inspire an environmental ethic that leads to positive changes in our behaviour, and a decreasing personal impact.

All Forest Therapy Walks are led by the CRCA’s Senior Conservation Educator, Stana Luxford Oddie who is accredited by the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs. Luxford Oddie has more than two decades of experience connecting people of all ages to nature.

For more information on the CRCA Forest Therapy Walk program, or to sign up for either the public sessions or a private session, visit crca.ca/forest-therapy-walks.

For more information about the Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority, visit www.crca.ca.


Release source and lower photo: CRCA.ca
Top photo: Eduardo Braga (cc)