UPDATE: CRCA Extends ‘Watershed Conditions Statement – Water Safety’

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broken ice

UPDATE – March 6, 2019: The Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority (CRCA) has again extended its Water Safety Statement:

“Weather forecasts indicate that air temperatures during the week of March 4th are expected to remain below seasonal, followed by above zero highs during the week of March 11th to kick off the spring season. The water content in this year’s snowpack is currently above average and there is a significant ice layer at the ground surface which may lead to increased runoff, as infiltration will be impeded. Ice accumulation in creeks, ditches, culverts, etc. may restrict flows, potentially leading to localized flooding of low-lying areas.

Widespread flooding is NOT expected at this time. However, if you witness flooding and/or require assistance your first point of contact is the local municipality.

Staff will continue to monitor conditions and forecasts and will update statements as needed. This Watershed Conditions Statement will remain in effect until March 27, 2019.”


ORIGINAL POST:

RELEASE — The Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority (CRCA) has extended the current Water Safety Statement for the region.

With current weather forecasts indicating above zero highs this week and the possibility of 10 – 15 mm of rainfall on February 24th, CRCA is urging residents to use caution around dams (inflow and outflow channels) and waterbodies in general.

“Unpredictable ice conditions remain.”

Water Managers in the Cataraqui Region continue year-round dam operations to manage water levels. Ice near a dam or flow structure can be thinner and less consistent than in other areas because of changing water currents beneath. Changing water levels can crack the ice, leaving it weak and unstable.


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Residents should also use caution and stay away from fast flowing watercourses and creeks. Creek banks and lake shorelines may be slippery, increasing the chance of falling in.

CRCA does not measure ice thickness for advising the public about ice conditions for recreational activities. Ice conditions can vary considerably from one waterbody to the next and within a single waterbody.

Staff will continue to monitor conditions and forecasts and will update statements as needed. This Watershed Conditions Statement will remain in effect until March 6, 2019.

For up to date flooding information, please visit the CRCA’s flood forecasting and information page at www.crca.ca/flood.


See below for watershed conditions terminology:

Normal: No flood conditions exist

Watershed Conditions Statement – Water Safety: High flows, unsafe banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.

Watershed Conditions Statement – Flood Outlook: Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high wind or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams, lakeshore flooding or erosion.

Flood Watch: Flooding is possible in specific watercourse or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individual landowners in flood-prone areas should prepare.

Flood Warning: Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities and individuals should take action to deal with flood conditions. This may include road closures and evacuations.


Release: CRCA.ca
Photo (cropped): Dave Bloggs (cc)